Toddlers

The time from eighteen months to three years is one of the most exciting periods of growth. Toddlers are able to do many new things. They run, jump, climb and have conversations with you. They begin to explore their power and independence. And they have their own thoughts about what they want and don’t want, like and dislike. You will often hear the words “No!”, “Mine!” and “I can do it myself.”
Toddlers are testing their limits and yours. They want to be independent, but they still depend on caring adults.

Your child may act like a three-year-old one minute and a one- year-old the next. He may have tantrums or break into tears because he can’t do everything for himself. As you guide him, he will learn self-control and become more considerate of others.

Toddlers

A Great Time to Learn Two Languages

Jasmine is learning Persian at home as well as English.

Toddlers

Children Learn Through Play

Your toddler learns through all his senses as he plays. He learns by moving, climbing, fitting into spaces and carrying and dumping things. His waking moments are filled with discoveries. Find ways to give him safe and interesting experiences. Call National Parent Info Network. Visit www.zerotothree.org.

Things You Can Do

Where to Find Help

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Children Develop Differently

  • Children Develop Differently
    Children develop and learn at different rates. Accept your child as he is and try not to compare him with others. But trust your instincts if you think there may be a problem. If you have questions or concerns about your child’s development, talk to your doctor or call California Early Start.

Learning Language

  • From 18 to 36 months, children learn many new words and use them in new ways. They first learn words for family, pets and favorite things. Later, they begin to use language for “make-believe.” They begin to label their feelings and tell you when they are happy, sad or mad.

    Your toddler may learn new words every day or may listen for months and then begin to speak in full sentences. If your child has no words at 18 months or no phrases at 30 months, ask your doctor how to have your child evaluated. Your child may need more help to learn language.
 
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